In the video above, I talk about the tangible and intangible benefits of hiring an executive coach.

Tangible Benefits of Hiring an Executive Coach

Financial Return

A recent study cited in an article on the Association for Talent Development reported that the return on investment for executive coaching is 689 percent. This ROI of 689 percent includes the upfront financial costs of coaching and the opportunity cost associated with the decision to start coaching.

Another research study found that for every dollar invested in Executive Coaching, there was return of 4 to 8 dollars. Financially, this suggests a better ROI (return on investment) than all savings accounts and certainly better returns than the average long-term annual returns (period from 1950 to 2009) of a basket of funds in the stock market that average around 7 percent when accounting for inflation.

Intangible Benefits of Hiring an Executive Coach

– Improve teamwork.

– An increased ability to make better decisions.

– Clarity in what lever needs to be pulled to get to the next level.

– An improvement in personal and organizational productivity.

– A better ability to talk to customers, stakeholders, and key decision makers in your firm or industry.

– An improvement in problem solving skills.

– A move toward thinking through issues systematically.

– A significant lowering of anxiety, stress, and feelings of inadequacy in the workplace.

The biggest benefit we have as Christians is that the Lord is walking with us.

“There was a man all alone;
he had neither son nor brother.
There was no end to his toil,
yet his eyes were not content with his wealth.

“For whom am I toiling,” he asked,
“and why am I depriving myself of enjoyment?”
This too is meaningless—
a miserable business!

Two are better than one,
because they have a good return for their labor:

If either of them falls down,
one can help the other up.
But pity anyone who falls
and has no one to help them up.”

Though one may be overpowered,
two can defend themselves.
A cord of three strands is not quickly broken.

~ Ephesians 4:8-10; 12

Reference

Greiner, N. (2018, August 29). Making the business case for executive coaching. Retrieved from https://www.td.org/insights/making-the-business-case-for-executive-coaching

“Analytics,” courtesy of Adeolu Eletu, unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Executive,” courtesy of Linkedin Sales Navigator, unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Staff meeting,” courtesy of rawpixel, unsplash.com, CC0 License

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